Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny

Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny

Policy Forum
Aug 06, 2020 39 min

Is Trump cooked?

Days after a presidential interview with one US-based Australian correspondent went viral, Mark Kenny chats with another stateside Aussie journalist Matthew Knott about the Jonathan Swan interview and Trump’s chances of reelection in November. Electoral surprises may have become the norm in recent years, so US presidential hopeful, Joe Biden, may not be resting as easy as many think. But with postal voting set to open soon in some states, is President Trump’s window to shake up the campaign closing too fast for the surprise 2016 victor to secure a second term? Plus with the president decrying ‘mail-in’ voting as opening the door for fraud, will the election results be seen as legitimate by his rusted on supporters? And does the US need an independent, non-partisan, federal electoral service like the Australian Electoral Commission to sure-up its famous democracy? In a week for Australian correspondents in the US, we talk to Matthew Knott from The Age and The Sydney Morning Herald about Trump’s electoral prospects, Biden’s options for running mate, and that interview. Matthew Knott is North America correspondent for The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to [email protected] You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University. 
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Aug 03, 2020 51 min

Understanding China

On this special Democracy Sausage we launch a new book on governance systems in China, Taiwan and Australia with its co-editor Andrew Podger and ANU Chancellor Julie Bishop, and discuss how COVID-19 is affecting Australia’s elderly. What does reform look like in China and how does the country’s governance stack up against Australia’s? Has reform in the country actually gone backwards under Xi Jinping? And how can business navigate the increasingly tense relations between China and other countries? On this Democracy Sausage Professor Andrew Podger, ANU Chancellor and former Foreign Minister the Hon Julie Bishop, and Dr Marija Taflaga join Mark Kenny to launch and discuss the new book, Designing governance systems for performance and accountability, co-edited by Professor Podger. The panel also examines COVID-19 in the aged care sector and whether Australia is doing enough to protect its elderly people. The Hon Julie Bishop is Chancellor of The Australian National University and was Australia's Minister for Foreign Affairs. Andrew Podger AO is an Honorary Professor of Public Policy at ANU, former Australian Public Service Commissioner and former secretary of several government departments. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Dr Marija Taflaga is Director of the Australian Politics Studies Centre in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia. She has previously worked in the Australian Parliamentary Press Gallery as a researcher at The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to [email protected] You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University. 
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Jul 30, 2020 1 hr 1 min

Annika Smethurst – On Secrets

Mark Kenny talks with Annika Smethurst about the police raid that changed her life and her new essay, On Secrets. On 4 June 2019, Federal Police raided the home of Walkley award-winning journalist Annika Smethurst, changing her life forever. Smethurst was expecting a cleaner - instead it was the federal police with a warrant. Five of them turned her place inside out, including going through her underwear drawer. In this special Democracy Sausage Professor Mark Kenny speaks to Annika Smethurst about the raid, its impact on her personally and professionally, and her new essay, On Secrets. A year before the raid, Smethurst had written an article about a proposal to allow the Australian Signals Directorate to spy on Australians. The AFP was investigating the possibility of the communication of classified material. Smethurst became the accidental poster woman for press freedom with her employer calling it a 'dangerous act of intimidation'. On April 15 2020, the High Court ruled the warrant invalid and on 27 May 2020 the AFP announced that Smethurst would not be charged over her stories that "... relied on classified intelligence documents". But the impact of the ordeal remains, and Smethurst joins us in this episode to discuss the raid that changed her life, and its implications for journalists all over the country. This discussion was recorded as part of the ANU/Canberra Times Meet the Author series. Annika Smethurst is National Political Editor for the Sunday News Corp mastheads The Herald Sun, news.com.au, The Daily Telegraph and The Courier-Mail. She is also a Director on the Board of the National Press Club. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to [email protected] You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University. 
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Jul 27, 2020 51 min

Will the show go on? With David Wenham

On this Democracy Sausage Mark Kenny is joined by actor David Wenham, theatre producer Caroline Stacey, and performer-producer Tracy Bourne, as well as regular guest Marija Taflaga, to talk about how COVID-19 has affected the dramatic arts. Few industries have been impacted as severely by the coronavirus restrictions as the performing arts. And while the government has set aside $400 million to attract foreign film and television productions to Australian shores, far less is on offer for the country’s home-grown productions. So will COVID-19 spell the last act for local film, television and theatre? Mark Kenny is joined by an A-list cast of actor David Wenham, theatre producer Caroline Stacey, and actor and teacher Dr Tracy Bourne, as well as regular co-star Marija Taflaga. Listen here: David Wenham is one of Australia's most well-known and respected actors, having appeared in movies, television series and theatre productions in Australia and abroad. He is known in Hollywood for his roles in The Lord of the Rings film trilogy, Van Helsing, and 300, and in Australia for his role as Diver Dan in SeaChange. Caroline Stacey is Artistic Director and CEO of The Street Theatre, Canberra’s leading creative producer dedicated to ambitious contemporary live performance. Dr Tracy Bourne is a singer, singing teacher, writer and director, and is Artistic Director of SEAM (Sustainable Environment Arts Movement) Inc, an organisation that aims to engage people with the issue of climate change through community art and performance projects. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Dr Marija Taflaga is Director of the Australian Politics Studies Centre in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia. She has previously worked in the Australian Parliamentary Press Gallery as a researcher at The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to [email protected] You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University. 
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Jul 23, 2020 49 min

Debt, deficit, and disaster?

On this special Democracy Sausage Second Serve Mark Kenny and Peter Martin discuss today’s economic update from the Treasurer and the impact of the corona-crunch on the nation’s future. The economic update given by Treasurer Josh Frydenberg today made for a sobering read, with net debt expected to rise to $677 billion by 30 June 2021, GDP down seven per cent in the June quarter, and unemployment expected to hit more than nine per cent at the end of the year. So has the coronavirus crisis led Australia into a debt and deficit disaster? And with the pandemic far from over, what does the future hold for Australians in this bleak economic climate? Joining Professor Mark Kenny to crunch the numbers is The Conversation’s Business and Economy Editor Peter Martin. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Peter Martin is a Visiting Fellow at Crawford School of Public Policy at The Australian National University and the Business and Economy Editor of The Conversation. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to [email protected] You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University. 
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Jul 20, 2020 1 hr 4 min

COVID-19 and hitting the wrong notes for the arts

On this Democracy Sausage we take a look at how the arts world has been impacted by COVID-19, plus whether the crisis has changed what Australians want from their governments, with historian Paul Pickering and composer and musician Kim Cunio. Even before the coronavirus crisis struck, artists were doing it tough – with crushingly-low salaries, and a sector withering from low funding, a reliance on philanthropy, and a workforce who have to take on additional skill sets to survive. But lockdowns around the world have highlighted how reliant we all are on the escapism and diversions that art of all kinds provide. So what could and should governments be doing to provide the support our creative artists need? Joining Professor Mark Kenny to discuss this and more are historian Professor Paul Pickering and head of ANU School of Music Associate Professor Kim Cunio. Kim Cunio is an Associate Professor studying composition and musicology in the School of Music of The Australian National University. He is an accomplished researching composer and performer and was awarded an ABC Golden Manuscript Award in recognition of his work with traditional music. Paul Pickering is a Professor at The Australian National University and Director of the ANU Australian Studies Institute. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to [email protected] You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University. 
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Jul 16, 2020 1 hr 0 min

The Dismissal (the Palace Letters Director's edition)

Far from being private correspondence, the Palace Letters – finally released to the public this week – detail the long road to one of the world’s great constitutional crises. On this Democracy Sausage, Mark Kenny is joined by Frank Bongiorno and Chris Wallace to discuss what we now know about The Dismissal. On 11 November 1975, Prime Minister Gough Whitlam was dismissed from his role by the Governor-General, Sir John Kerr. Nearly 25 years later and after a lengthy legal battle, the correspondence between the Governor-General and the Queen’s Private Secretary is now public. The letters, dating back more than a year before that historic day and running to more than 1,000 pages, shed new light on a political and constitutional crisis. Joining Professor Mark Kenny to discuss what we’ve learned from the Palace Letters are historians Dr Chris Wallace and Professor Frank Bongiorno. Dr Chris Wallace is a Visiting Fellow at ANU School of History. Entering the history profession after a first career as an economic and political journalist in the Canberra Press Gallery, her work focuses on political, international and global history with special reference to leadership. Her book historicising the 2019 Australian federal election, How To Win An Election, is expected in November of 2020. Professor Frank Bongiorno is the Head of the School of History at ANU and an Australian labour, political, and cultural historian. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to [email protected] You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University. 
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Jul 13, 2020 59 min

Is going to the footy fair play or foul?

On this episode of Democracy Sausage we take a look at the rising infection rate in Victoria, the optics of Scott Morrison going to the football on the weekend, what the modelling tells us about the virus’ trajectory, and Trump’s troubles in the US. With Melbourne in lockdown and rising rates of community transmission in Victoria and beyond, did Prime Minister Scott Morrison play it badly by going to the football, or would staying away have sent the wrong message? Do the COVID-19 numbers suggest that Australia has missed the boat on going for a policy of elimination? And with the economy likely to struggle for some time, will there be a move to raise the rate for those left unemployed? On this episode of Democracy Sausage Professor Mark Kenny is joined by Professor Quentin Grafton and News Corp Australia’s Annika Smethurst. Professor Quentin Grafton is an ANU Public Policy Fellow, and Director of the Centre for Water Economics, Environment and Policy. He is also Editor-in-Chief of Policy Forum. Annika Smethurst is National Political Editor for the Sunday News Corp mastheads The Herald Sun, news.com.au, The Daily Telegraph and The Courier-Mail. She is also a Director on the Board of the National Press Club. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to [email protected] You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University. 
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Jul 09, 2020 58 min

China’s rise - is history repeating?

On this Democracy Sausage, Mark Kenny is joined by former long-time public servant Allan Behm to discuss community values in the COVID-19 crisis, the “serious vacancies in leadership” around the world, and learning the lessons of history to understand China’s behaviour. In launching Australia’s new Defence Strategy Update recently, Prime Minister Scott Morrison drew parallels between the strategic and economic threat Australia currently faces with that faced by the world in the 1930s and 40s. While China’s growing assertiveness is not the only cause of this uncertainty, it is likely front of mind for many in the Australian government. But is this analogy with contemporary Western history useful, or should we be digging deeper into China’s own history to better understand the present? What does the recent lack of ‘subtlety’ in the actions of the Chinese government say about its self-perception? And, with many major Western democracies struggling to cope with the COVID-19 crisis, how fit are their leaders to navigate this changing global order and prevent major conflict? On this Democracy Sausage Second Serve, we’re joined by experienced former public servant, now head of The Australia Institute’s International and Security Affairs program, Allan Behm. Allan Behm is Head of the International and Security Affairs program at The Australia Institute, CEO of FearLess - a charity that works with people living with the consequences of post traumatic stress - and Chair of the Canberra Writers Festival board. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to [email protected] You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University. 
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Jul 06, 2020 55 min

From Southeast Asia to Eden-Monaro

This time on Democracy Sausage we take a look at Southeast Asia: how the governments of the region are responding to Australia’s new defence stance, how they have responded to COVID-19, and how they are balancing the great powers of the US and China. The panel also takes a look at the outcome of the weekend’s Eden-Monaro by-election. Just as Australia is carefully calibrating its relationship with China, the countries of Southeast Asia are having to balance their role now and into the future between two great powers, and do this while battling a pandemic. So how does the region view Australia’s new defence stance, and can the countries of ASEAN walk the strategic tightrope in this era of volatility? Joining Professor Mark Kenny to discuss these issues, as well as the outcome of the Eden-Monaro by-election, are Associate Professor Bjoern Dressel, James Massola of the Sydney Morning Herald, and regular podleague Dr Marija Taflaga. Associate Professor Bjoern Dressel is a Senior Lecturer at Crawford School of Public Policy at The Australian National University. His research focuses on issues of comparative constitutionalism, judicial politics and governance, and public sector reform. James Massola is Southeast Asia Correspondent for The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age. He has been a Walkley and Quills finalist on three occasions, won a Kennedy Award for outstanding foreign correspondent, and is the author of The Great Cave Rescue. Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. Dr Marija Taflaga is Director of the Australian Politics Studies Centre in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia. She has previously worked in the Australian Parliamentary Press Gallery as a researcher at The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to [email protected]cyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University. 
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Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny
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News
Episodes
93
Frequency
Ongoing podcast
Website
policyforum.net/
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