Gravy
Spinning Carolina Gold Rice into Sake
Dec 11, 2019 20:06

Spinning Carolina Gold Rice into Sake

For much of the 19th Century, Carolina Gold rice was a favorite of American rice growers, before disappearing in the early 20th Century. Brought back to life in the 1980s, it again occupies a much beloved, if niche, place in the South's canon of heirloom ingredients. Now, Hagood Coxe, a daughter of a Carolina Gold farmer, wants to make sake, a Japanese rice wine, out of the grain.
Are prison diets punitive? A report from behind bars
Dec 04, 2019 23:40

Are prison diets punitive? A report from behind bars

Prison food often leads to poor health for the incarcerated. That's a public health problem everyone should care about because 95% of inmates return to their communities.
Access Denied: Cooperative Extension and Tribal Lands
Nov 27, 2019 23:34

Access Denied: Cooperative Extension and Tribal Lands

Cooperative extension is a century-old government program that places agricultural agents in counties to educate and work with farmers. But for years, agents failed to show up for Native American communities.
Preserving Community Canneries
Nov 20, 2019 19:43

Preserving Community Canneries

Community canneries–facilities, often subsidized by local government, where people can in bulk–are closing. With groceries easily available even in rural communities, there's less need. And with busy schedules, people have less time for the labor-intensive process of canning their own food. But people who continue to use the still-operational canneries, like Arnold and Donna Lafon, find community and pride in the practice.
Mahalia Jackson's Glori-Fried Chicken
Sep 05, 2019 24:56

Mahalia Jackson's Glori-Fried Chicken

In addition to her work as an international recording artist and civil rights activist, the Queen of Gospel entered the restaurant business in the late 1960s with Mahalia Jackson’s Glori-fried Chicken. The fast food chain was more than a brand extension for the star; it was the first African American-owned franchise in the South. Producer Betsy Shepherd tells how Mahalia used the gospel bird to push for economic empowerment in the black community.
Where Mexico Meets Arkansas
Aug 29, 2019 23:05

Where Mexico Meets Arkansas

Menudo, sopes, gorditas, tortas, gringas, huaraches, mangonadas, and alambres are just some of the specialty dishes of Dequeen, Arkansas, population 6,600. A majority of the town's residents are Latino. Many of them migrated from Mexico to southwest Arkansas for jobs in poultry processing plants. Producer Betsy Shepherd attends Fiesta Fest, the town’s Cinco de Mayo celebration, to sample local food and music and to hear stories from the men and women who make it.
A Taste of Dollywood
Aug 22, 2019 24:51

A Taste of Dollywood

Dollywood, Dolly Parton’s Appalachian-themed amusement park, draws millions of country fans and thrill seekers to Pigeon Forge, Tennessee, every year. Recently, the park has started marketing itself as a culinary destination. Producer Betsy Shepherd goes on a Dollywood tasting tour to gain insight on her musical idol and experience Dolly’s vision of the mountain South.
Electric Tofu
Aug 15, 2019 26:32

Electric Tofu

In the early 1970s, two hundred hippies from San Francisco’s Haight Ashbury neighborhood resettled in rural Tennessee. They founded a vegetarian commune and agricultural operation called The Farm. With help from their neighbors and a psychedelic soundtrack from their house band, the back-to-landers got their social experiment off the ground and produced some of the first vegan cookbooks and commercial soy products in the United States.
Biscuit Blues
Aug 08, 2019 24:29

Biscuit Blues

How a radio show sold flour—and the Delta blues
The Magical, Meandering Life of Eugene Walter
May 30, 2019 25:38

The Magical, Meandering Life of Eugene Walter

Eugene Walter (1921–1998) of Mobile, Alabama was a novelist, a poet, a playwright, an actor, a costume designer, and a food writer, among myriad vocations and avocations. Twenty-one years after his death, producer Sara Brooke Curtis asks: Why don’t more people know about him?