Design Thinking 101

Design Thinking 101

Design For America: Students + Design Thinking + Community Impact, Part 1 — DT101 E36
Dec 12, 2019 42:01

Design For America: Students + Design Thinking + Community Impact, Part 1 — DT101 E36

Welcome to the Design Thinking 101 podcast! I'm Dawan Stanford, your host. Today's episode is part one of a two-part series on Design for America. Design for America is a nationwide network that supports innovation for social impact. DFA was founded at Northwestern University, and is helping to shape the next generation of social innovators and design-led studios on over 40 college campuses. Today, we’ll speak to three guests about what Design for America is and what does the experience look like when a member participates in a Design for America studio. We start our episode with Eric Richards explaining how he founded Design for America on the UC San Diego campus. Eric was interested in human-led design and, coupled with his interest in social impact, Eric started to search Facebook for others who had a similar desire in utilizing both fields interchangeably. He found a Good Design Lab founded by Don Mormont at UC San Diego. Many of the UC San Diego students who were interested in human-led design had worked at this lab. Eric liked the concept, applied to the university, and was accepted to the program. Through this lab and Don's involvement, many design classes were available to students. Eric joined Good Design Lab as a sophomore - the year after the lab was founded - and took the introductory design class. During his journey with Good Design Lab, Eric became part of a very tight-knit community. He was grateful to have found a community that, like Eric, valued using their skill set for social impact. Andrew Demas discovered DFA by accident while he was a student. He had a friend who was involved in DFA, and one day Andrew visited the Good Design Lab. He fell in love with the process and how the process affects social impact. DFA taught Andrew how to find out who your user is, gaining empathy for the user, and developing a solution for someone else. His new perspective not only changed the way he solved problems in real-world applications, it also changed his view of how he thinks about his curriculum at school, and changed the way he works towards coming up with solutions. Throughout this time, Andrew was connected to many other students who had a passion for design and for giving back to their community in a sustainable way. He was able to put his newfound skills to use when he and his classmates rebuilt a community center that was destroyed by Hurricane Sandy. Andrew felt that DFA gave him his best college and learning experience in university, and he’s passionate about his alumni board and networking for future leaders of design thinking and to get more corporations involved with DFA. William Moner is a faculty member who sponsors a DFA Studio at Elon University. Dawan Stanford approached William to mentor and encourage students to engage in the design process. William talks about the process of creating a DFA Studio, using DFA guides, and bringing together the efforts of everyone involved to make DFA happen on campus. He also discusses the challenges of mentoring and recruiting students for DFA. Bio Eric Richards is starting his last year at UC San Diego, where he's studying Human-Computer Interaction and Design for Social Innovation. His interest is in design that empowers communities and advances equity and sustainability. He currently leads Design for America at UCSD, and advises undergraduate humanitarian engineering projects on campus. Andrew Demas is a Senior Managing Consultant in IBM's Digital Strategy & IX practice and is also the digital account partner for one of IBM's top telecommunications clients. As an IBM Design Thinking Leader, he runs the New York Design Thinking Chapter. His passion for design started with DFA; he served as President of the Barnard-Columbia Design for America Studio for three years, and he currently sits on the DFA Alumni Board. William Moner is an Assistant Profes
Integrating Engineering, Design and Business with Tony Hu — DT101 E35
Nov 26, 2019 42:13

Integrating Engineering, Design and Business with Tony Hu — DT101 E35

Stanford, your host. Today I'll be interviewing Tony Hu, who is the academic director at MIT’s MIT’s Integrated Design and Management Master’s program. We’ll be talking about how Tony discovered design, human-centered design’s impact on students, and MIT’s unique program combining design and engineering management. We start our episode during Tony’s high school career, with his passion for writing. He started on the journalism team and edited the school newspaper. Additionally, he was interes
Teaching and Learning Service Design for Designers and Non-designers with Maurício Manhães — DT101 E34
Nov 05, 2019 45:55

Teaching and Learning Service Design for Designers and Non-designers with Maurício Manhães — DT101 E34

Welcome to the Design Thinking 101 podcast! I'm Dawan Stanford, your host. Today I'll be interviewing Maurício Manhães and talking about his design position at Savannah College of Art and Design, his work at the Service Design Network and as the group leader at the Design Academic Task Force. In this episode, we talk about the crisis that caused Maurício to shift into service design, how service designers are learning their craft, and his work to create service design curriculum for non-designers.
Humble Design Leadership + Design Agency and Experience Design Evolution with Aleksandra Melnikova — DT101 E33
Oct 22, 2019 04:00

Humble Design Leadership + Design Agency and Experience Design Evolution with Aleksandra Melnikova — DT101 E33

Welcome to the Design Thinking 101 podcast! I’m Dawan Stanford, your host. Today I’ll be interviewing Aleksandra Melnikova and talking about her position as Head of Experience Design at Publicis•Poke in London, England. In this episode, we talk about humble design leadership and how design is evolving to better serve our clients and the world. Aleksandra tells us about how her art, sculpture, and drawing training inform her work as a designer and leader. Today, we explore Aleksandra’s work and her team at Publicis•Poke in London, design agency evolution, how she leads an experience design team with a wide array of talents, and how she inspires by mentoring people outside work. Aleksandra likes to start from a blank sheet of paper and accepting that she and her team have a great deal to learn from and with clients. She fosters the culture of not being afraid to ask questions and being blunt about the information and what is going right and wrong. She encourages her team to spend 80% of their time on questioning. She believes the answer she needs will come to her when the question is formulated in the right way. Aleksandra talks about design agencies approaches to the work, and noted agencies are getting away from presentation culture and moving towards collaborative approaches to working with clients. She enjoys going into a business and looking at their workflow as a point of reference to start her work with the client. “We are communicators of connections in this world,” and Aleksandra believes these connections are systematic connections, and they more they are exposed, the better the end product. This episode also offers a look at the shift in approach to user design, and how the previous system of UX design was disjointed compared to today’s design thinking process of a team working together to manage the entire project. She talks about exposing research and data to clients that they have not synthesized into their operations, and how the data set is made into practical actions to solve problems. She also talks about how her team acts as a facilitator to the design thinking process. About Aleksandra Aleksandra’s mission is to bring the power of connected disciplines into design, research, and team management. Her background is in the Arts and Product Service Systems Design, her playground for creating new methods, tools, and approaches that frequently challenge existing structures and the status quo. Two of her biggest strengths are storytelling and system thinking. During the past 11 years, Aleksandra has worked from both the client and agency perspective and successfully delivered digital experiences for companies such as VISA, Lloyds, TSB, SKY, Aviva, VSO, GSK, and British Airways, and she has led the experience design team within Publicis•Poke. She has collaborated with UK universities, mentored at Global Service Jam, and has been a speaker on the topics of connections between literature, art, and design. In This Episode [01:30] Aleksandra’s journey in design thinking. [05:04] She describes the team she leads as Head of Experience Design at Publicis•Poke in London. [05:25] How Aleksandra brings out the best in her team, which has a wide array of talents. [06:58] Aleksandra coaches humility with her team, based on the ever-changing world and the lack of knowledge we have because our world changes so fast. [08:56] How Aleksandra assists clients in adapting to this process of questioning when they are working together. [10:50] Tuning the relationship with the client when they haven’t worked with a team who uses design thinking. [13:06] How blurring the boundaries on design affects the work being done by her team. [15:03] Is there a shift in approach to experience design? [18:54] The five why questions Aleksandra uses when having conversations with her clients. [20:08] Vie
A Short Introduction to Design Thinking with Dawan Stanford — DT101 E32
Oct 01, 2019 24:06

A Short Introduction to Design Thinking with Dawan Stanford — DT101 E32

Welcome to the Design Thinking 101 podcast! I'm Dawan Stanford, your host. Today I'll be giving you a brief introduction to design thinking. It starts with a story about Doug Deitz. In 2012, Doug was a principal designer at GE Healthcare. Doug designed a new MRI machine. One day, observing the new model in action at a hospital, Doug encountered a distraught child who had to undergo an MRI. He found out that over 80% of children had to be sedated to receive an MRI. Since he designed the original MRI machine, he felt responsible for this and wanted to remedy this issue for children. So, he spoke with teachers and other professionals who interact with children on a day-to-day basis, asking them how he could make their experience in an MRI machine less traumatic. As a result of those conversations, Doug and his team found a way to modify an MRI machine for children. They added stickers to the floor with water and rock on them. Covered the MRI with stickers that looked like wood planks and sails. Now, instead of a scary piece of hospital equipment, the MRI looked a lot like a pirate ship.. They even created a storybook that accompanied the themed MRI. Parents could read to their child the pirate ship adventure story ahead of their child’s scheduled appointment. These changes resulted in a decrease in the need for sedation from 80% to 27%. Today, we explore how seeing the problem is an integral part of design thinking, and we’ll break down design thinking into process, methods, and mindset. The process is your step by step "rough" guide. With the methods, we have a bit more cohesion; design methods help us explore problems in specific ways, and guide us to ask questions in new ways in order to discover the right problems to solve. The mindset is something you have to practice your way into, in order to learn how to change your mindset. At its most basic, design thinking is the discipline of finding human problems worth solving, and creating viable new options in response. In many ways, it's the discipline of helping people ask the right questions at the right time. This episode also offers a definition design thinking that replaces creativity myths with truths about discipline and action. I break down the design process into Seeing, Solving, and Acting, and talk about why we should think about design from the perspective of the people we serve. In This Episode [01:26] Doug’s background in MRI science and his experience with a child getting an MRI. [03:04] Over 80% of children need to be sedated to have an MRI or a CAT scan. [06:15] Design thinking can be broken down into process, methods and mindset. [07:07] What has design thinking given students, and how design thinking can shape curriculum and projects inside the classroom. [08:02] The definition of design thinking. [09:57] Creating viable new offerings and what is defined as “new”? [12:11] Breaking down the design process into its three main components: seeing, solving and acting. [15:09] Responses generated from a fixed mindset in opposition to the responses from a growth mindset. [16:51] Everything is a prototype and designers are open to questioning how things work. [20:17] What Doug was Seeing as he redesigned the children’s MRI experience. [22:54] Delivering solutions based on what you are seeing. Links and Resources Elon By Design and The Center for Design Thinking, Elon University Fluid Hive Dawan Stanford on Twitter Design Thinking 101 Podcast on iTunes, and on The Podcast App Transforming healthcare for children and their families: Doug Dietz at TEDxSanJoseCA 2012 Ten Types of Innovation
Launching and Leading a University-wide Design Thinking Initiative with Danielle Lake — DT101 E31
Sep 03, 2019 54:14

Launching and Leading a University-wide Design Thinking Initiative with Danielle Lake — DT101 E31

Welcome to the Design Thinking 101 podcast! I'm Dawan Stanford, your host. Today I'm interviewing Danielle Lake. She is the Director of Design Thinking and Associate Professor at Elon University. As a feminist pragmatist, her scholarship explores the connections and tensions between wicked problems and the movement towards public engagement within higher education. Her current projects focus on exploring the long-term impact of collaborative, place- and project-based learning, design thinking practices, and pedagogies of resilience. Lake is co-editor of the book series, Higher Education and Civic Democratic Engagement: Exploring Impact, with Peter Lang Publishing. Danielle started her journey by designing her own major; she called "designing life" her philosophy, relating to who we are and what we want to do. In her Ph.D. program, she uncovered "The Field of Wicked Problems," while working with her Ph.D. advisors Kyle White and Paul Thompson, looking at large-scale systemic crises needing a different approach. She had learned from many experts before discovering design thinking, and she asked herself how she could take her teaching, research, and service, and weave them together. Today, we explore how design thinking has played out in Danielle's teaching, such as redesigning student outcomes so that a final product is a practical solution to a current issue. This way of teaching has flipped the classroom for Danielle, and she talks about how this methodology on student learning has been very impactful in her classrooms. Project-based, relational, and on-going learning experiences are critical ingredients for long-term learning. Early on, she faced some challenges: opening up to students, starting small, and finding ways to invite other experts in and allow them to lead with their expertise. Danielle is looking to continue to design courses to give students the time to delve into the work they value. We'll also dig into the relationship between design and philosophy, and how they work together to give us a place to start in learning about our environment, being collaborative, and solving societal issues. Danielle also talks about what she hopes to accomplish in her professional relationships moving forward, and we’ll hear a little about Dawan's own journey in discovering design thinking and the creation of Fluid Hive and The Education Design Lab. Dawan also talks about how he was introduced to Elon by Design, and his process of discovering design thinking was part of the Elon culture, and the importance of having the space to learn with others who are practicing design thinking. Learn More About Today’s Guest Danielle Lake, Elon University In This Episode [02:26] Danielle’s journey into design thinking. [04:06] Working with her advisors in her PhD program. [05:25] Discovering design thinking and applying this to new curriculum at Grand Valley State University. [07:07] What has design thinking given students and how design thinking can shape curriculum and projects inside the classroom. [09:17] Danielle’s study of the long-term impact on student learning. [13:32] Danielle speaks about her early challenges when implementing design thinking in the classroom. [17:20] Where Danielle is now with her new role at Elon. [19:32] How Danielle helps her students to launch their work forward and apply their work in the community. [21:05] Students carving out relationships in society, applying their work from university. [22:11] Danielle’s perspective on the relationship between design and philosophy. [25:44] She asks, “How are we going to step in and learn from our mistakes?” [26:39] What is Danielle hoping to achieve with her professional relationships? [28:16] Dawan talks about where we want to take design thinking in the Elon University Program. [30:45] Fluid Hive’s launch in 2
Redesigning a Design School + Designing Higher Ed with Jason Schupbach — DT101 E30
Aug 20, 2019 41:42

Redesigning a Design School + Designing Higher Ed with Jason Schupbach — DT101 E30

Welcome to the Design Thinking 101 podcast! I'm Dawan Stanford, your host. Today I'm interviewing Jason Schupbach, who is the Director of the Design School at Arizona State University. Prior to this position he was Director of Design and Creative Placemaking Programs for the National Endowment for the Arts, where he oversaw all design and creative placemaking grantmaking and partnerships, including Our Town and Design Art Works grants, the Mayor's Institute on City Design, the Citizens' Institute on Rural Design, and the NEA's Federal agency collaborations. Previously, Jason served Governor Patrick of Massachusetts as the Creative Economy Director, tasked with growing creative and tech businesses in the state. He was formerly the Director of ArtistLink, a Ford Foundation funded initiative to stabilize and revitalize communities through the creation of affordable space and innovative environments for creatives. He has also worked for the Mayor of Chicago and New York City's Department of Cultural Affairs. He has written extensively on the role of arts and design in making better communities, and his writing has been featured as a Best Idea of the Day by the Aspen Institute. Jason has always been interested in people who harness creative talent and is interested in systems which support creative artists and designers in cities. He wanted to know how he could create spaces for creatives to collaborate and have the ability to solve problems. Today, we explore how Arizona State University is applying design thinking. ASU is the largest university and is engaged in social justice by creating educational opportunities with Starbucks and Uber. Challenges for design schools and how we need to teach soft skills and power skill sets knowledge. We'll also dig into how businesses are looking for students who can work collaboratively with soft skills as well as working knowledge of a field. How we can use goals and objectives to build online degrees integrating design thinking and why this must be done collaboratively and without one person delegating the entire process. How privilege plays a role in student preparedness to step into a designer role. Jason's role in providing local schools with how design thinking can be learned and applied inside the classroom. He is passionate about us all being in the boat together, tackling world problems with his programs. Learn More About Today’s Guest Jason Schupbach on LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/jasonschupbach/ In This Episode [01:38] Jason’s background and how he arrived as a design thinking leader. [05:55] Design Thinking applied in Arizona State University. [06:55] Making the world a better place using research which is valuable. [08:17] Jason’s pitch to ASU to become a relevant, equitable and collaborative university. [09:18] The poison in our society with a single leader and no collaboration. [12:11] Why multiple skill sets are needed to solve today’s complicated problems. [14:55] Engineering and business school at ASU incorporates design thinking. [17:15] Assets we can use to build out and harness the power of design thinking. [19:07] Jason asks, “How do we create and build using architectural mindset?” [21:41] How students are presenting what they have learned and how privilege plays a role in student preparedness to step into a designer role. [22:02] Support systems ASU puts in place for students in need. [27:45] The NASA space map and how students designed future spaceships which they projected into the space model. [30:35] Changes in US policy which are affecting student’s financial ability and quality of life. [33:45] The change is coming and why it’s higher education’s job to implement change. [37:47] Design a good human as well as a good student. Links and Resources Arizona State University https://www.asu.edu/ Research and Innovat
Designing Culture at Work + Social Innovation + Necessary Disquiet with Lauren Currie — DT101 E29
Aug 06, 2019 55:23

Designing Culture at Work + Social Innovation + Necessary Disquiet with Lauren Currie — DT101 E29

Welcome to the Design Thinking 101 podcast! I'm Dawan Stanford, your host. Today I'm interviewing Jason Schupbach, who is the Director of the Design School at Arizona State University. Prior to this position, he was Director of Design and Creative Placemaking Programs for the National Endowment for the Arts, where he oversaw all the design and creative placemaking grantmaking and partnerships, including Our Town and Design Art Works grants, the Mayor's Institute on City Design, the Citizens' Institute on Rural Design, and the NEA's Federal agency collaborations. Previously, Jason served Governor Patrick of Massachusetts as the Creative Economy Director, tasked with growing creative and tech businesses in the state. He was formerly the Director of ArtistLink, a Ford Foundation-funded initiative to stabilize and revitalize communities through the creation of affordable space and innovative environments for creatives. He has also worked for the Mayor of Chicago and New York City's Department of Cultural Affairs. He has written extensively on the role of arts and design in making better communities, and his writing has been featured as a Best Idea of the Day by the Aspen Institute. Jason has always been interested in people who harness creative talent, and he is interested in systems which support creative artists and designers in cities. He wanted to know how he could create spaces for creatives to collaborate and have the ability to solve problems. Today, we explore how Arizona State University is applying design thinking, and its engagement in social justice by creating educational opportunities with Starbucks and Uber. We also talk about the challenges for design schools, and how we need to teach soft skills and power skill sets’ knowledge. We'll also dig into how businesses are looking for students who can work collaboratively with soft skills as well as a working knowledge of their field. We’ll talk about how we can use goals and objectives to build online degrees that integrate design thinking, and why this must be done collaboratively and without one person in charge of the entire process. We’ll discuss how privilege plays a role in students’ preparedness and ability to step into a designer role, and Jason's role in providing local schools with how design thinking can be learned and applied inside the classroom. He is passionate about us all being in the boat together, tackling world problems. Learn More About Today’s Guest Jason Schupbach on LinkedIn In This Episode [01:38] Jason’s background and how he became a design thinking leader. [05:55] Design Thinking applied in Arizona State University. [06:55] Making the world a better place using research. [08:17] Jason’s pitch to ASU to become a relevant, equitable, and collaborative university. [09:18] The poison in our society with a single leader and no collaboration. [12:11] Why multiple skill sets are needed to solve today’s complicated problems. [14:55] Engineering and business school at ASU incorporates design thinking. [17:15] Assets we can use to build out and harness the power of design thinking. [19:07] Jason asks, “How do we create and build using an architectural mindset?” [21:41] How students are presenting what they have learned and how privilege plays a role in student preparedness to step into a designer role. [22:02] Support systems ASU puts in place for students in need. [27:45] The NASA space map and how students designed future spaceships which they projected into the space model. [30:35] Changes in US policy that are affecting students' financial ability and quality of life. [33:45] The change is coming and why it’s higher education’s job to implement change. [37:47] Design a good human as well as a good student. Links and Resources Arizona State University https://www.asu.edu
Behavioral Science + Behavior Change Design + Social Impact with Dustin DiTommaso — DT101 E28
Jul 23, 2019 52:58

Behavioral Science + Behavior Change Design + Social Impact with Dustin DiTommaso — DT101 E28

Welcome to the Design Thinking podcast! I’m Dawan Stanford, your host. Today I’m interviewing Dustin DiTommaso. Dustin is a designer and researcher who works to integrate the study and application of behavioral science and human-centered design to develop digital interventions that change real-world behaviors. In 2009, he founded the Behavior Change Design practice at Mad Pow, where he and his team have designed effective interventions for improving health, financial well-being, and life-long learning. When he’s not working on client challenges and creating new real-world interventions, Dustin teaches “Design for Behavior Change and Social Impact” at the Rhode Island School of Design. He also collaborates on grant work with colleagues from University College London’s Centre for Behaviour Change and other academic affiliations. Today, we travel down the path that Dustin took to get to where he is today. From his work at Botticelli Interactive, through the advertising world, and then back home to design, Dustin chats about his need to impact society in a meaningful way, and why behavior change design has resonated the most with him. Dustin shares information on how he and his team approach their design projects and the methods they use to quantify and qualify third-party research. He also delves into their use of the COM-B model in creating, applying, and implementing their designs. They even use this framework when explaining the product to their clients! Dustin shares several fantastic resources that he has written and used to inspire his design mind. He also provides some insights on how gamification in behavioral design has been used inappropriately and how it could be better. Learn More About Today’s Guest Dustin on LinkedIn Dustin on Twitter: @DU5TB1N Mad Pow In This Episode [01:28] Welcome to the show Dustin DiTommaso! He shares how he moved into designing for behavior change. [03:20] How self-determination theory and motivation helped shape Dustin’s design practice. [04:39] After realizing advertising was not for him, Dustin met Amy Cueva, the founder of Mad Pow, and moved into using design to change lives. [06:13] How do projects flow in behavioral design? [11:15] When there are conflicts in the evidence, how do they compare and use that information? [15:15] What kinds of methods do they use and how do they adapt them in the design stage? [16:16] The COM-B model and how it applies to behavioral change design. [22:19] COM-B is used to address all kinds of questions and tailor approaches for all involved. [23:30] How do new designers react to the model? [27:00] When walking clients through the details of the model and application, how do they break everything down? [28:47] Do their client workshops help their team as well? [32:38] Dustin shares more about his work in gainful design as applied to different contexts. [38:15] What approaches to teaching about gainful design have been working? [42:53] Learn what resources Dustin recommends to those looking to get into behavioral design. [45:59] What is most impactful from a design perspective for those in public health? [48:31] Some final resources… and how to find Dustin! Links and Resources Design Thinking at Work The Reflective Practitioner by Donald Schon Innovation with Information Technologies in Healthcare Botticelli Interactive Why We Do What We Do by Edward L. Deci Self-Determination Theory in Practice by Jennifer LaGuardia Design for How People Learn by Julie Dirksen AR & VR for Behavior Change by Julie Dirksen, Dustin DiTommaso, and Cindy Plunkett The Art & Science of Engagement by Dustin DiTommaso Behavior Change Design: Toward a Vision of Motivational Technology; Solutions for Health & Healthcare Health Experience Design Conference (HXD 2018): Dustin
Speculative Design + Designing for Justice + Design Research with Alix Gerber — DT101 E27
Jun 11, 2019 43:07

Speculative Design + Designing for Justice + Design Research with Alix Gerber — DT101 E27

Welcome to the Design Thinking podcast! I’m Dawan Stanford, your host. Today I’m interviewing Alix Gerber. She’s currently a Visiting Assistant Professor at Washington University in St. Louis, and has been developing and teaching courses there, such as Radical Design, where undergraduate students imagine alternatives to civic experiences like policing, capitalism, or voting. During our conversation, we talk about speculative design, designing for justice in Ferguson, Missouri, teaching radical design, and how her practice and teaching have influenced her as a design researcher. Alix is a design researcher who works with people to visualize and enact the futures we imagine, provoking discussion around how our society could be more equitable and meaningful. Alix has worked with residents of Harlem, New York, and Ferguson, Missouri, to explore alternatives to our current policing and court systems by making artifacts from divergent futures. She grew up in a family of designers; both of her parents as well as her brother have all chosen careers in design. She enjoys learning from her students when teaching her Designing Creativity: Innovation Across Disciplines class at Washington University. Alix is always learning and restructuring her teaching method to create a better learning experience for the students in her class, and working to design real life experiences for her students to learn from at the university. Today, we explore Alix’s design career path from her start while attending Cornell University, and then following her design experience and growth through several different design types and projects during the last eight years of her career. Alix explains the different types of design she has used, when each type of design worked well in a project, and how the design tools she uses are applied in design thinking. We’ll also dig into her teaching assignment, where Alix instructs undergraduate students on social design issues, and on understanding the impacts of different design perspectives on society. Learn More About Today’s Guest Alix Gerber on LinkedIn Designing Civic Experiences In This Episode [01:26] How Alix started her career with taking human-centered design at Cornell. [03:00] Her shift to design with social problems, her shift to graduate schools and why she wanted this shift. [03:57] Alix’s time at Parsons and studying transdisciplinary design. [05:25] Types of projects she participated in when studying transdisciplinary design. [07:25] Speculative design and how this differs from problem-focused design. [09:01] How she assists clients with a speculative design project. [11:45] Framing alternative problems in a design project. [14:53] Alix’s work in Ferguson - how her work started and developed. [19:18] Speculative design tools Alix uses in everyday work on her projects. [21:14] How Alix defines radical design within design thinking and what she is teaching at Washington University. [27:44] Light bulb moments for students in context to understanding the user experience. [29:44] What Alix does to assist her students when they are struggling with ideas in class. [29:44] Using radical and speculative design and her work projects in relation to how they influence Alix as a design researcher. [39:45] What Alix would like to be practicing over the next few years based on her cumulative experiences in design. Links and Resources Email Alix at [email protected] Washington University in St. Louis Design Thinking at Work The Reflective Practitioner by Donald Schon Innovation with Information Technologies in Healthcare Designing Radical Futures Instagram Tag #radicalcivics Parsons School of Design IA Collaborative Lab at OPM Introduction to Speculative Design Practice Elliot Montgomery, Assistant Professor of Strategic Design and Management Extrapola